Friday, 10 June 2011

The healing power of women

Photographer: David J. Green MUA&stylist: Shannon Hyne Designer: Lucy Tammam for House of Tammam Model: Alex B.

As I was having breakfast this morning I checked my Facebook wall and found a wonderful video-clip shared by Anne Enke, the woman behind Anne of Carversville - I was featured by AOC last December, as you may recall, and continue to read AOC as well as being in touch with Anne through social networking sites.
The video-clip, which you can see below, is made by Max Dashú, who also writes the blog Veleda.
Max's project is fascinating. She has been  involved with the Suppressed Histories Archives since the 1970s and is reclaiming women's past history as shamans and healers, something that has always been associated with men. She has collected evidence from the art imagery of different cultures to support the proposition that it was women who were the original healers and this occurred cross-culturally. Indeed she has amassed a wealth of archaeological evidence and is currently engaged in making a film about her research.
I welcome Max Dashú's project. Women need to be reminded that patriarchal values can be opposed. There is an alternative to the war-mongering culture we seem to be living in and that alternative, which is for both men and women to share, is rooted in revalorising the immense and active contribution of women to cultural history, an input that has systematically been undermined and suppressed.
Max Dashú is fund raising for her film project. I am myself donating and I would urge you to consider doing the same, her target is $7,000. You need not give a huge amount. Every little bit helps.
Why do it?
I will quote Max:  "We've been taught that women spiritual leaders didn't exist, or were rare exceptions, or insignificant. We've also been told that the shamanic cultures were superstitious, backward, ignorant. Woman Shaman: the Ancients shows the reality, making visible the long and rich cultural record of medicine women, diviners and oracles, trance-dancers, shapeshifters, and women who journey through the worlds. To experience the beauty and power of these spiritual legacies is medicine for the spirit, especially for all the women who have been pushed down, marginalized and silenced in the name of religion. And it's an offering for everyone who knows the immeasurable value of aboriginal spiritual ways. They are our birthright, however far back we have to go to reach it...Contributing to Woman Shaman is a way for you to vote for media you would like to see". 


Please do give and spread the word. You can find out more about the project by visiting the Woman shaman website


3 comments:

  1. I dont honestly know what happened but here is the comment by Jochanaan


    Ah, I wish I had any money to give! I have thought for a long time now that a rejoining of feminine energies to masculine ones (or at least to the healthy type of masculine energy) and a new honoring of "das Ewigweibliche" (Goethe, Faust, last scene), would go far towards healing the world. And this is not against my Christian beliefs either: God is both masculine and feminine (see Genesis 1:27), and I cannot imagine S/He approves how women have been suppressed these millennia. The Bible records how in ancient Israel, women were judges, warriors and prophetesses. And wasn't it women who were largely responsible for Northern Ireland's current relative peace?

    The rock opera I performed in in 2008, "Magdalene, Woman of Light", was all about rediscovering the Divine Feminine and how Mary Magdalene may have been "the disciple whom Jesus loved" (John 13:23-25,21:20). Some conservative Christians are rather horrified by this, of course; but I figure it makes little difference to what Jesus came to do: to teach, and be the sacrificial Lamb of God. He himself was notably, even "notoriously," generous and accepting towards women--and that's going only by the canonical Bible books!

    We must regain a new appreciation of women and women's gifts. I only hope it's not too late.

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  2. Thanks for restoring the comment. I wondered what had happened to it, or if you had just not been able to approve comments for a while! :) Blessings.

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