Saturday, 17 January 2015

Model thinness and eating disorders

Me with other models and MUA/hairstylist at Maggie Killick's fashion show

I was very intrigued by the article published in today's Guardian and authored by Caroline Evans, from Central St Martin's, University of the Arts. It is about the issue of model thinness and it makes the point that models from when the profession began have always been slender. Incidentally slender is not the same as skinny, but let's go on. The article is actually a plug for the exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, Silent Partners. Artists & Mannequins from Function to Fetish, which is on until Jan 25th and which I now really want to see, as it sounds most interesting. The exhibition is about mannequins, not models. The article plays on the double meaning of the French word mannequin, which also refers to models in flesh and blood who were initially named  'living mannequins'. It is an article that ends quite abruptly, quoting another University of the Arts  academic, Agn├Ęs Rocamora, from London College of Fashion,  who maintains that there is no real correlation between model sizes and eating disorders and that it will never be possible to substantiate any claim to the contrary.
Not really sure about that.


Silent Partners Exhibition trailer
I don't know whether Rocamoras' statement was taken out of context but I find it surprising. If the argument is that models have always been thin, they must be thin for whatever reason, and body image anxiety and eating disorders that seem to be so prevalent in our contemporary society have little to do with the fact that models are thin and that there is no quantifiable data that shows any link, well this argument does not strike me as sound. It strikes me as disingenuous. To begin with, one can never say that it will never be possible to find a link. Why so?
For one thing, extreme  thinness as a requirement for modelling has had a direct link on eating disorders in those instances of models and would-be-models that starved themselves to death and died on the catwalk.
A model I personally know told me that the agency that initially signed her put her under so much pressure to lose weight that her parents had to intervene - she was only 17 at the time - so she eventually changed agency and she is now working a lot, being a UK size 8 , 5'11 in height and weighing 59 kg - she had been asked to go down to at least 50kg.


Anna Carolina Reston a model who died because she was suffering from anorexia

Model Bonnie Bee, when campaigning for  Models of Diversity,  talked about her struggle with anorexia and how long it took her to recover. Young girls are encouraged to lose weight in order to be ready for Fashion Week. So here you have at least one demonstrable correlation between model size and eating disorders. 'Oh but not everyone is  or wants to be a model". This is the difference between attitudes to models in the 1900s up to well into the 1950s, when models were perceived to belong to the demi-monde and no respectable woman  really wanted to be a model, and attitudes today ,when every young girl looks at magazines and wants to be a model, because some models become celebrities and/or they date famous actors, rock stars and footballers. So young girls do starve themselves in the hope of being scouted or simply to be perceived as beautiful like 'so and so'.
Only in June the same newspaper carried an article about size zero campaigners discussing body image issues at an event held at that very same college where Rocamora teaches and at that event the correlation which Rocamora believes does not exist was discussed at length.

Eliana and Luisel Ramos models who died after starving themselves

It seems to me that today's  article is making the point that model thinness is OK. As I understand it this is how the argument goes: model thinness does not REALLY have a link with body image, body anxiety and eating disorders. Only a little bit, maybe. But young girls do not starve themselves because they see thin women in magazines and on the catwalk. Oh no, they do it for different reasons altogether. Models have always been thin, there was no anorexia amongst young women in the early 1900s, though models were thin even then.
Now let me ask you this question: until very recently it was OK to have models that were only white skinned. That has, begrudgingly, changed. The arguments for white skinned models were " Oh I am not racist, it's just that paler complexions make the clothes look better" Or "you can't do much with non-caucasian hair". Compare this with saying "Oh clothes fit better on a very skinny body, that's why models have to be skinny".
Of course, there was no correlation between racism and the absence of models of colour. It was only an aesthetic choice. Or was it?
Do you now see why the article in The Guardian makes me feel uncomfortable?

Monday, 12 January 2015

Acrobats and clowns


Model : me. From Metropolitan Magazine, Jan 2015 issue

I don't know what compelled me to go and watch Kooza, a show by the Cirque du Soleil, on a cold and rainy Sunday evening  but I certainly do not regret it.
I was brought up on a Fellini diet and he was a great circus lover.  La Strada which is one of the best films ever, one which I cannot watch without bursting into tears as soon as I see  Gelsomina's face, is about a violent circus performer and a carefree sweet girl who is sold to him and performs mime and clownish acts only to die prematurely and so many more films by Fellini portray scenes from circus life, with his beloved clowns.


I too love the clowns. They are acrobats who  bring out the fragility of the human experience, through their fake clumsiness and their slapstick. And of course, the 'serious' acrobats, the tumblers, the contortionists: they mesmerise me. They are human beings with a hyper disciplined body: yet in one split second, things can go incredibly wrong, a reminder of our inescapable mortality.
I saw Cirque du Soleil for the first time many years ago, in the 1990s. I went back yesterday and  I was transported. Cirque du Soleil's shows are wonderful: they bring together some of the very best acts from around the world and they have a theme that is explored throughout the evening. Add to it gorgeous music, skilled dancing and you have a typical Cirque the Soleil performance.
Their show for the Oscar ceremony 2014 was beautifully put together, beautifully choreographed, with scenes from famous movies juxtaposed with live acts. It was also an implicit homage to the stuntmen of Hollywood of yore, a breed that is fast disappearing in these days of enhanced digital manipulation.


But the circus no, it will never disappear. It's been around for thousands of years.
I can't sit still if I watch the circus. I am totally focused on  the performers and hold my breath when they do something dangerous - basically all the time - and then let out loud gasps and begin to applaud and shout out my appreciation. Sometimes I stand up, to the annoyance of those sitting behind me - I do not do this these days but I used to.  From where I was sitting yesterday everyone after a while began to behave like me though, leaning forward, gasping and with cries of 'Oh my god...Ahh'.
I love the  focus and body control that is on display and the fact that there is always, always  a sense of real danger. When  things go wrong, we are made aware that  these are people with real bodies challenging themselves to do  the most daring things ever. Last night  I saw women tumbling in stilts, performing triple somersaults before landing upright on their stilts on a tiny mattress held by their colleagues,  contortionists who seemed to be made of rubber, two men who appeared to have the gift of flying when they got out of the rotating Wheel of Death contraption - the very name is a reminder of what it can actually do - and a Chinese acrobat who would stand upside down on some ten chairs stacked high on top of each other, carefully balancing on them on his hands and performing splits in the air. I could not believe my eyes.
Two years ago a Cirque du Soleil acrobat died in mid performance. It was horrendous for the audience to watch. But that is the life of a circus performer, full of calculated risks and tremendous exhilaration.
Even more than the actual acts, I love watching circus performers in rehearsal, without the glitter of their magnificent costumes - last night I nearly fainted at the sight of so much satin and feathers and diamante.
In Bristol in 2002 The Invisible Circus began performing in squats and in derelict buildings, providing a sense of community. The film by Futureartists Invisible Circus . No dress rehearsal follows them on a four year journey, for 98 minutes. Beautiful performances!



Invisible Circus: No Dress Rehearsal - www... by futureartists

 Today The Invisible Circus is a thriving company, praised for its educational work.
Nothing beats the circus and it has to be seen live, films and DVDs cannot do it justice.
Which is why I braved a cold evening and went to see the amazing Kooza. I strongly recommend it.

Sunday, 4 January 2015

2015 From the Future into the Present




Metropolitan Magazine cover Model: me 

Any fan or even non-fan, anyone who is aware of the film Back to the Future knows that this is it, this is THE year. 2015.  And what will it bring us?
No, I am not going to engage in yet another piece of writing to assess the year gone by and forecast what 2015 has in store for us. You can pick just any magazine for that, it is customary to begin the year with a write up on what has happened and what we might expect.
2015 has a ring to it, only because it was the year that featured in the Zemeckis' movie.
But it's just a new year. We mark the end of one year and the beginning of the next on the 1st of January. Other cultures mark the new year at a different time, in Spring for example.
We know that our Christmas and New Year  took over the Winter Solstice celebrations. The winter solstice is important in the northern hemisphere because on 21st/22nd December we get the shortest day of the year.
Anyway, back to 2015. Back to the future. I am well past the half a century milestone and so glad I am still around. These days the fifth decade of one's life is not regarded old age yet, but this is a relatively new development. When I was fifteen  anyone over the age of thirty was definitely past it, as far as I was concerned. I had plenty of time to revise that opinion.


This month the department store Selfridges celebrates the Bright Old Things, which features 14 people aged from late 40s to 80s who have found a new vocation in their mature years and who have made a mark for themselves. It is a celebration of agelessness, so they say. I would see it as a celebration of maturity and the fact that older people continue to be creative, in other words, creativity does not belong only to the young. Such a misconception, one that has always been proven wrong. Take someone like Ludwig van Beethoven (of whom I am a great, great fan). He composed his splendid Ninth Symphony in his late forties, and he was totally and completely deaf, on top of everything!
Anyway, though the Bright Old Things is ultimately a marketing ploy, it is an intelligent one. It opens on 18th January. Susan Kreitzman, who was featured in the film Fabulous Fashionistas, the expatriate New Yorker who has made London her home  is one of the people selected for this project and I look forward to seeing what she has designed for the store.


I have a personal connection with the Bright Old Things. I too began a new career in my late forties, as a model,  and I have now had the honour of modelling for the feature written about the event in Metropolitan, the magazine available to Eurostar travellers in three languages. I am in fact on the cover (and inside the magazine). The article is written by Billie JD Porter, known as a contributor to
Vice, Dazed and Confused and Jalouse, discussing the new phenomenon of 'silver power'. So if you are travelling on Eurostar throughout January, either Paris bound or Antwerp bound, look out for the magazine on board!
Happy 2015 everyone! Celebrating my very first cover!

Sunday, 21 December 2014

Sensory marketing: a big hype?



Photo: Terry Slater "Zoomphoto". Model: me 

Sensory marketing is in full swing. A while ago the cake makers Mr Kipling unveiled a giant edible billboard in Westfield, made up of little cup cakes which were then distributed to people when the board was taken down a few hours later. It gave people the opportunity to see, smell and then eat the lovely, exceedingly sugary, cakes. 


Mr Kipling's edible board

Fashion events have also embraced technology that enhances the sensory experience. Ralph Lauren's 4D experience last Autumn in NYC involved the use of scents and holographic water projection.
The idea is to engage all the senses, not relying exclusively on (boring) vision.
Aradhna Krishnan, Professor of Marketing at the University of Michigan, is one of the most prominent writers on sensory marketing and why this is the way of the future: in her book Customer sense: how the 5 senses influence buying behaviour (2009) she states: "Accepting the importance of the senses brings about a change in how a manager views his or her products. What changes can be made in the packaging, branding, and advertising to captivate the consumer's senses? What changes can be made to the product itself?" And indeed her questions have been taken on board very seriously - hey guys, there's bucks to be made here. We can see more and more attempts at selling us things appealing to our sense of smell or that of touch - the sense of hearing is already fully engaged  in advertising campaigns, we see things and we hear sounds, most commercials involve the auditory experience and the visual intertwined. The  advertising of the future may include ways of letting us smell perfumes and inhale the aroma of chocolate and what-have-you when the ad appears on our screens.

Ralph Lauren's show. Images: Ralph Lauren

It's the era of neuro-marketing - another neuro-trash, neuro is the buzzword of the moment, there is even a neuro-philosophy and  a neuro-literary criticism, believe it or not. I am waiting to see the birth of quantum- aesthetics, that would be interesting but quantum has not had the same PR as neuroscience, maybe because of its indeterminacy?
This appeal to the senses for branding has its supporters - anything that can boost sales is welcome - but also its detractors. I for one would not wish to be constantly assailed by technologically recreated odours, the smells of the city are just enough for me, not would I relish  being  bombarded with exotic smells all the time. The attempt to engage touch leaves me very indifferent. I am used to seeing ads and I know how to switch off, it has become ingrained for us to see images and pay little attention to them, even though they still work at a subliminal level.
I am not saying this because I don't care about smelling, touching or hearing.  It's just that to me me smelling and touching, not to mention tasting,  are very, very personal. I already hate it when people go round distributing confectionery and asking you to try one - all that sugar!  I once went to a casting where they were distributing chocolate bars - that's poison to me, I like my chocolate to be bitter and completely organic, I would not have a Cadbury flake near me ever - well, unless they paid me to hold it (just joking). It's already quite a task to shake off politely eager assistants at airport duty free shops, waving their little card samplers with scents on them to invite you to buy the fragrance of the day - I wait for them to engage another customer and then go and choose my fragrance, if I have to get one.

Raymond Tallis' thought provoking article in the New Humanist

Ok maybe I am not enlightened enough. But reading that Martin Lindstroem, the guru of sensory marketing  and author of the best seller Brand Sense: Build Powerful Brands Through Touch, Taste, Smell, Sight, and Sound (2005) has uttered words of caution is enough to make me ponder whether sensory marketing is after all a big hype. According to the branding expert  "Scent is extremely powerful and dangerous if used wrong. So far, we're not advanced enough to use it that way, but I've wanted to have a dialogue on the implications of this, and nobody's talking."
Quite.

Friday, 12 December 2014

Romancing yourself


Passion coach Vena Ramphal. Photo by Irven Lewis

The British Yoga Festival was in full swing at the Design Centre in Islington, north London, last  weekend.  I visited on the opening day and was drawn to one of the workshops in particular,  it seemed different from the others, full of promise. Entitled 'Head, Heart and Hips: the Yoga of Relationships' and led by Vena Ramphal,  a 'passion coach' who specialises in relationships, the workshop lived up to its promise and was  intellectually and emotionally satisfying.
What Vena  really teaches you and encourages you to do is to have a fuller, more meaningful relationship with yourself. She says that one needs to see oneself as a whole, never as a 'half', stressing that being with someone is not about being completed by someone else but about being enriched by and enriching someone's life.

Photographer: Vanessa Mill. MUA: Tori Harris. Model: me

In the workshop we covered topics such as breath, the body, the mind, manifesting and using savasana, the corpse pose, as a way to listen to the body. Savasana is the most important yoga pose!
Vena talked about cultivating romance and ended with five very important points which I am passing on to you, my readers, in the order in which  I received them and without any commentary of my own:
1. Romance doesn't just happen. It needs to be invited in.
2. You can't force the magic. Romance will visit when it's ready.
3. A clear relationship nurtures romance.
4. Romance breathes in the space(s) between you.
And the final one, which I thought was really  beautiful and nourishing: always have a secret romance with yourself.
Thank you Vena, you truly are a breath of fresh air!

Monday, 1 December 2014

From Magalene.co



Photographer: Vanessa Mill. MUA: Tori. Model: myself


I am very proud to announce that I have contributed to Magdalene.co an article about going grey. You can find it here. Enjoy!